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. we will stop the bad stuff. >> the defense cemetery has said any exceptions will have to get approved by him. the implication is there are going to move fairly dramatically in this direction. do you have any concerns right now about what they have said so far about basically opening up all of these specialities to women? >> if they do that, they're going to have a fight on their hands. we do have that responsibility. if it means introducing legislation, that is one thing. we can be reasonable with them. the originally talked about 2016 when they would get the recommendation. >> they said there would be a need for legislation. it implied that you did have specific issues that there were parts of this that you do object to. what we would like to know is are there specific part of women and in combat in which you think they should not be serving? >> when they talk about the infantry officers activity. there are two women who tried to go through that program. they were unable to do so. it is just resembled that they will use their experience in passed to know what women can and cannot do
in this business. he had been secretary of the navy under ronald regan and assistant secretary of defense under ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid o
are militarily defensible? >> i think that it's all negotiable. the quartet principles of 2006, which president bush laid down in the two-state solution, all of those issues have to be resolved. land for peace, trading land, all of those are final status issues that are key to the future of israel or before israel can agree to anything. >> so you're saying you might describe a resolution of this crisis involving withdrawal to the pre-1967 borders as perhaps one among several tenable solutions? >> as part of what has been talked about and defined, as i said the main the 2006 quartet principles and u.s. resolutions -- u.n. resolutions that that is part of a final status set of issues that have to be resolved. the united states, no other country can impose that on israel. that is a negotiable issue. but it has been out there. that remains to be dealt with in negotiations. >> is it one that you think the united states should encourage? >> i would encourage peace and a secure, safe israel. that is what i think most of this would want to see. >> ok. in 2009, you made a statement suggesting that u.s.
senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first welcome senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. -- lively. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitment to the national defense over his 20 years on this committee. and i know that we are going to work well together and continue the bipartisan tradition of the committee. we are also pleased to welcome the eight senators who are joining the committee this year, both of those who are new to the senate and those who are new to our committee. senators donnelly, hirono, kaine, and king on the democratic side, and senators blunt, cruz, fischer, and lee on the republican side. you will all find that this is a wonderful committee where we work across party lines to support our troops and their families, and their
glenn was on it, lee hamilton, james woolsey, they had access to the defense department secret documents and information and they came out with quite a different view. let me point out some of the things they came up with. they said maintain the triad. they said maintain tactical nuclear weapons. they recommended no change in the alert status. the defense department's nuclear posture review under president obama and secretary gates found the alert status should not be altered. they fundamentally found a need for nuclear-weapons. that's the point. your commission basically says it undermines their request for nuclear-weapons. i will give you a chance to respond. global zero foresaw this argument before your report was issued. they said "the conditions that might make possible the global elimination of nuclear weapons are not present today and their creation would require a fundamental transformation of the world political order. that's a very strong statement and i think it was aimed at this idea that it is practical and realistic for us to expect the world is going to move to zero nuclea
to consider the nomination of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. before i begin, i want to first will come senator inhofe as the new ranking republican on our committee, succeeding senator mccain. senator mccain has been a great partner over the past six years, and i thank him for all the work he has done to get bills enacted, his leadership on a host of issues, his support for the work of this committee, and for always keeping our hearings likely. senator inhofe has shown his strong commitment to the national defense over his 20 years on this committee. and i know that we are going to work well together and continue the bipartisan tradition of the committee. we are also pleased to welcome the eight senators who are joining the committee this year, both of those who are new to the senate and those who are new to our committee. senators donnelly, hirano, kaine, and king on the democratic side, and senators blunt, cruz, fischer, and lee on the republican side. you will all find that this is a wonderful committee where we work across party lines to support our troops and th
an important question. i do not deny for one second that we have had to take a good decisions about defense spending. let me make this point. at 33 billion pounds a year, we have the fourth largest defense budget anywhere in the world. it is important that we make sure that we have the right scale and shape of armed forces, and they have the right capabilities. that is why in the defense review, we are investing in drones, special forces, a key intelligence capabilities, making sure that we also have the aircraft we need to ensure that we have highly mobile armed forces. i am incredibly proud of what our armed forces do. because we are balancing our budget, and will be better equipped for the future. >> 68 years ago this sunday, the nazi concentration camps of auschwitz was liberated. as we mark holocaust memorial day, will the prime minister committed to ensuring that young people in this country always have the opportunity to learn about what took place in the darkest period in our shared history, and will be commend the work of the holocaust educational trust? >> i think my honorable fri
the election. he was clearly responding to these issues, missile defense, i think particularly and maybe nuclear issue also. he was not consulting with the american people, he did not tell congress what he wanted to do but he was willing to discuss it with the russian leaders. i'm asking you, will you comply with the treaty-making matters? if these agreements are significant military liquor i believe they should be -- militarily believe they should be done by treaty and not by two leaders. >> i would commit to fulfilling any treaty obligations and commitments to congress and any conversations that congress has to be a part of, absolutely. >> i'm not sure that answers the question. congress is concerned about these negotiations going on. we don't have the -- the president made it clear that he believes in zero nuclear weapons. that is his policy for america. i think it is utterly unrealistic and that is amazing to me. that could lead us to unwise decision making. congress has a responsibility to the american people to ensure national defense. we need to know and have you share those negot
that the second amendment secures a fundamental individual right. merrick and have the right to self- defense. they have the right to have guns in their homes to protect their families. no one can take away those rights or their guns. the second man that rights are the foundation on which our discussion rest. they are not at risk. what is at risk is lives. lives are wrist when responsible people fail to follow laws to keep guns out of that hands of those who use them to commit murder, especially mass murders. i ask we focus our discussion on additional statutory measures to better protect our children and all americans. i say this as a parent and the grandparent. ours is a free society, and open society. we come together today to consider how to become a safer and more secure society. no one begrudges the government assistance provided to victims of mass tragedies made possible by those law we passed after the bombing in oklahoma city. the bill introduced last week against gun trafficking will soon prove helpful and i believe it will become an accepted part of our free more. it, too, is commo
mentioned earlier, defense nominee chuck hagel will have his confirmation hearing by the senate armed services committee at 9:30 this morning. c-span will be going to that live, so it will be a shortened washington journal. that begins at 9:30 a.m. eastern time live on c-span and on c- span.org. for the next hour, we want to turn our attention to the u.s. auto industry. the annual car show has left detroit and it is now at the washington convention center. our colleague pedro echevarria is at the convention center. host: you will find a mix of automakers' foreign and domestic. we are in the toyota section this morning. talking to us about issues concerning toyota is tom stri cker. his vice-president for technical and regulatory affairs and deals with energy and environmental research. how do you explain your job? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regul
unequivocally why diplomacy and development are right up there with defense. we think about who we are as americans, it's because we are united and committed across our government to do what ever is required -- whatever is required to fulfill the missions we have assumed as public officials and public servants. so next week i would expect that all of you will be as focused and dedicated for secretary kerry as you have been for me and that you will continue to serve president obama and our nation with the same level of professionalism and commitment that i have seen firsthand. on a personal basis, let me wish all of you the very best, whether you've been here a week or 30 or even 40 years. [laughter] let me give you the very best wishes that i can because i'm proud to have been a part of you. i leave thinking of the nearly 70,000 people that was honored to serve and lead as part of a huge extended family. and i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me and make our country proud. thank you all and god bless you. [cheers and applause] [cheers and applause] >> thank you.
on the national defense authorization act and she decided to introduce an amendment, we have to work in a way where it would not come up and say, let's repeal the entire policy. let's give commanders the flexibility to assign women to wherever they need to be, wherever they meet the needs of the battle grounds. that was replaced, substituted by an amendment of a report that came out in february. that is how the report came out. that started it going, a little more press, a little more engaging in this topic. we decided to present this caucus called the women in the military caucus. it was formed in order to develop a forum where we can discuss this issue. it was such a, do not touch this issue kind of deal. she just wanted this time and this form to get into the details of this policy and bring in experts to talk about this. we had a couple of briefings here and there. for all defense policies and congressional laws, it goes into the national defense authorization act. for the entire year, what i am doing is can he ready for that time. it is extremely difficult to get past all of the challeng
hagel has been nominated to be that next defense secretary. that is showing tomorrow on sunday here on c-span at 3 p.m. here's a look look at some of the new members of the 113th congress. massachusetts senator elizabeth warren was a advocate for the formation of the consumer financial protection bureau. she defeated scott brown and the came the first woman to represent massachusetts in the senate. in the house, joseph kennedy represents massachusetts's fourth district. watch in the house, live on and the senate on c-span 2. and this week's radio address, president obama and congresswoman susan brooks talked about needing to reduce the national debt. the president emphasized investing in programs that enable economic recovery. susan brooks urged democrats to pass a budget. >> hi, everyone. we face some important decisions about how to put down our debt in a way that grows our economy and create good jobs. the decision that will make a real difference in the strength of our recovery. we began with economists and business leaders saying that we are poised to grow. there are signs of progre
affairs programming. >> next, a house hearing on military sexual assault. then defense secretary leon panetta announces he's lifting the ban on women in combat. then at iowa gov. terry branstad gives his condition of the state address. >> we have created a platform that we call a digital health feedback system. the main components are an adjustable center that turned on when you swallow it. it communicates with your body. it sends information to a level patch that you wear on your torso. it collects information about your physiology and the medicines use wallop. sleep, temperature, or treat. this will give you a panel of a physiological wellness. it communicates through radio and enables us to take the data, process it, and give it back to you in an application that will help you manage yourself. >> we are at an inflection point. now, "calls it in point. we have had all these incremental amazing changes over the past five years, and now we are poised to make some great leaps in these complex diseases. our understanding of cancer over the past couple of years has board -- dwarfed all o
of the president's state of the union address and how foreign and defense policy will be handled. then senator kirsten gillibrand discusses bipartisan safety legislation. later, former representative gabrielle giffords on gun violence. >> on thursday, a hearing on u.s. workers and retirement savings. live coverage from the senate health education and labor and pynchon's committee. that is live thursday at 10:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. >> we are the best country in the world. what a marvelously stupid thing to say. of all the countries in the world, pretty good. what we have to believe that we are the best? what does that mean? and once we have to assert it all of this time? what does it mean to other people? american products go around the world, so you are observed by people in every corner of the world. and we teach them not to like us. gratuitously. >> randall robinson, taking your calls, e-mail, facebook comments, and tweets. sunday at noon eastern on book tv on c-span2. >> president obama is set to deliver the state of the union. a discussion on how foreign policy and national security i
that is necessary for hunting, sports, target practice, even self defense? >> it would be not legal for hunting in most states where there are limits on how many rounds you can have in a magazine. as i think you have recognized, the second amendment is not primarily about hunting. what i have been talking about is what the supreme court said in the district of columbia versus heller, which is the second amendment, the firearms and their accessories which are commonly owned by law-abiding people for legitimate purposes. i am talking about what police officers carry, what citizens carry, semi-automatic handguns. >> but those are police officers. >> they are not military, they're not coming to attack people, they are protecting people. citizens protect themselves the same when the police officers do. >> if you can rationalize a 100- round drum that someone can strap onto a semi-automatic weapon, as did in aurora, colorado, killing dozens of people there, saving lives only because it jammed, then you ought to object to the laws that have been on the books for years about machine guns. why are they
. it is not just a matter of not being on the defensive in the debate. bringing up the hard cases for the other guy. it is also about making long- term arguments about what government has done. all too often, not just our candidates but people on the front lines often find our content with the talking points. the clinton problem is that it's a political problem. -- cocoon problem is not just a political problem. how to reengage more -- people in this room in impacting this argument. creating a space where politicians are more comfortable doing it. >> one challenge that we have with appealing to women voters, i think it is also true of men who are -- who only have a high school diploma are have trouble finding a good job. and obama's america, we are all having trouble finding a good job. [laughter] women think that when they are voting for democrats they are voting for security. single women, many of whom have children and who feel quite vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might around in their own lives -- might go wrong in their own lives. they want that safety n
appointed that he is becoming the top defense appropriators. he had said very recently that he did not think sequester would be averted. it does not look currently where these parties are that they are close to any kind of a deal. they may try to find a way to kick the can down the road where they bought themselves 60 days. it does not look particularly good right now. very few people seem to be confronting that. it shall take a lot to pull this off. >> the pentagon has started to take steps to prepare itself for the sequestration and planning that has not taken place until now. >> they are laying off temporary employees. it is starting to happen. >> senator inhofe has been critical about not planning earlier. the >> there is a little brinkmanship going. i do believe there was a time and when each everybody said we are all against it so how can have them? there never was a path that the two sides could find that would lead them to averting it. >> the center was critical of the president in the stance of his overall military and mention three ways the president has worked for cuts, and delays
defense, national laboratories, pell grants for education, highways, every other thing, the investments that we need to make in research to grow this country, it all gs for medicare, medicare, social security and the debt. every single penny we collect, and that's only 12 years away. now, that's not me talking. that's the congressional budget office saying that. the medicare trustees have told us, the medicare trustees have said that in 12 years, the medicare program won't have enough money to pay its bills. now, whose bills? bills of seniors, bills of tennesseans who have been -- who are some, many are literal counting the days until they are old enough to be eligible for medicare so they can have some way to pay their medical bills. it would be a tragedy if that day arrived and there wasn't enough money to pay the bills, but the medicare trustees who by law are supposed to tell us these things say that day will come in 2024. it's just 12 years, just 12 years away. and that's a day for people already on medicare and people who are going to be on medicare. medicaid, which is a program f
. the president has nominated someone for secretary of defense. we all will meet with him and his hearing will be next week he was part of a group called global 0. for those that care about our nuclear arsenal, some of the things that brought offered in this report are disconcerting. typically, the defense department presses for weaponry and making our country is safe. the state department presses for nuclear arms agreements and reductions. in the event this person is confirmed, that balance will not be there. you and i spent a lot of time on the treaty. you let me be involved in the ratification. i am wondering if there is something you might say to me in that sees our future in a way with that combination of these two people, something you can say to assure me about our nuclear posture in the future and the role he will play in that regard. >> absolutely. i know chuck hagel. i think he is a strong, patriotic former senator and he will be a strong secretary of defense. i have dealt with him and and number of forays. he has been head of the atlantic council, some of the things and efforts
the ones again missed the target. phone number ability of critical infrastructure defense energy, health care -- the question is how should this be dealt with? i think it is important to address the bowl -- address the goal of cyber security without creating some enormous cyber industrial, rigid industrial complex that would produce an endless losing cat and mouse game that the affected how actors are going to win every time. you ought to make sure that cedras security is not used in a way that exposes the electronic communication of the american people to government and corporate snoops. having talked about content that our people want to remain private, i want to spend a minute talking about content that ought to be shared and why that is a key plank in our innovation agenda as well. what shills the sharing of collaboration and ideas is copyrights and patents. rights holders -- rights holders are too eager to use their power to share offer -- to scare off challengers to the status quo. this perpetuates stagnation. indisputably the protection of intellectual property is important. my da
] and not have to worry about the law. obama was very interesting. in my defense, a week before or two weeks before the election in l.a., i routed column suffering from myself rather severely, to use a romney word, from some of my colleagues on the right to have defected to obama and i named them. i said i was going down with the mccain ship because i knew it was going out and i would not waver. i never imagined i would support obama over mccain. i was very strongly for mccain. i thought he was a very good man. he did not run a very strong campaign. we seem to have a habit of doing that. but here's what was interesting about obama. if you remember the transition, he made very centrist appointments. for example, he kept the gates at the fence. he picked geithner for treasury, who had worked hand in glove with the bush administration through the financial crisis. he picked hillary as secretary of state. blogger was one of the major advisers. volcker was one of the major red visors. when he ran in 2008, he ran as a roar short chest. he was not a very disturbing the radical candidate. that was t
the defense authorization bill. 380 amendments, and we went forward and did the right thing. i am guardedly optimistic. >> we did postal reform. towards the end of the year, little noticed, but there were some complicated pieces of legislation. they did not pass the house, most of them, but they got through the senate with a good bipartisan support. >> do you buy this pendulum idea that it reached its nadir? >> maybe i am wrong. maybe that is not the case. we were able to make certain progress in other areas, and i think historians that study the senate will look back on this version of this nuclear option, because if it had happened, and it was going to happen unless we came up with this road map for the leaders -- >> this is the filibuster reform. >> on the filibuster, that if the senate had gone to a 51- vote body, it would have changed the nature of the united states senate forever. >> before you leave, senator schumer, you have some quality time with the president. one of the hats you wear, you are chairman of the joint inaugural committee. and some of the jobs are -- >> ride in the li
there with the defense. it is because we are united and committed to do whatever is required to fulfill the missions we have assumed as public officials and public servants. so next week, i would expect that all of you will be as focused and dedicated for secretary kerry as you have been for me, and that you will continue to serve president obama and our nation with the same level of professionalism and commitment that i have seen firsthand. on a personal basis, let me wish all of you the very best, whether you have been here all week, or 30, or even 40 years, pat. [laughter] let me give you the very best wishes that i can, because i am proud to have been a part of you. i'll be thinking of the nearly 70,000 people thought -- i leave it thinking of the nearly 70,000 people that i was honored to serve and leave as part of a huge extended family, and i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me, and make our country proud. thank you all, and god bless you. [cheers and applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >>
was very interesting. in my defense, a week before, two weeks before the election in 2008, i wrote a column, sort of separating myself rather severely, to use a romney word, from some of my colleagues on the right who had defected to obama, and i named them, and i said that i was going down with the mccain ship because i knew it would be going down and i wasn't going to waiver. i never imagined i would support obama over mccain. i was very strongly for mccain. i thought he was a very good man. he didn't run a very strong campaign. we seem to have a habit of doing that. but here's what's interesting about obama. if you remember the transition, he made very centrist appointments. he appointed a -- he had, for example, he kept gates at defense. he picked geithner for treasury who had worked and -- hand and glove with the bush administration through the financial crisis. he picked hillary as secretary of state, volcker was one of the major advisors. the former president of harvard, i'm getting -- summer was in treasury. these are not radical appointments. what's interesting about obama is when
national defense. >> to mr. bennett, yes or no. >> no. sequestration is the dumbest way to allocate federal resources i can think of. [applause] there are some areas where i am a republican and i can say it,w e need to increase spending. it may well be that some of them are in survivor city or whatever. [laughter] >> not according to you, man. >> there are other areas where we need to cut spending more than the sequestration number. that is what the congress is for. congress should not forfeit its responsibilities to a single number automatically set across that ignores -- >> so you would give up your leverage to get spending cuts? >> am less interested in my leveraged than solving the problems of the country. >> i did not suggest i thought it was a good idea. obviously, it is an option. >> here is the fact about this. if seat cushions or to happen, 8% from agriculture infrastructure and the month. $1 billion in the special education. $3 billion from the pentagon's defense fund. $7 billion from army operations. earth worm does some work for the defense department. they could get her in this
. there is a role for that. there is justification for that. it is not just a matter of not being on the defensive in the debate. bringing up the hard cases for the other guy. it is also about making long-term arguments about what government has done. all too often, not just our candidates but people on the front lines often find our content with the talking points. the clinton problem is that it's a political problem. the cocoon problem is not just a political problem. how to reengage more -- people in this room in impacting this argument. creating a space where politicians are more comfortable doing it. >> one challenge that we have with appealing to women voters, i think it is also true of men who are -- who only have a high school diploma are have trouble finding a good job. and obama's america, we are all having trouble finding a good job. women think that when they are voting for democrats they are voting for security. single women, many of whom have children and who feel quite vulnerable to job losses or any change in the economy or anything that might go wrong in their own lives. they want
were at war in afghanistan, and the defense department paid out $629 billion. that is what the demographic numbers are doing to us. and we have to recognize that. one last shot. you talk about the rich. ok, i will confess here, personal numbers. i am still working. i am paying $20,000 a year in social security tax. i am drawing $41,000 a year in social security benefits. the minute i stop working, the $40,000 keep coming in, only goes up every year. why does warren buffett, why will oprah winfrey not have to draw the same social security benefits from the 1930's? why can we not say go ahead and work and pay in the program, but if you have so many assets, we will shave off the level of your payments. [applause] >> and then the wealthy would be paying more. absolutely. >> my sense is now that this is public and everybody is going on all these talk shows, this conversation is all over the place. >> we need the president. if i have this conversation and it is out there, here is what happens. my friends in organized labor, my friends in the environmental movement, my friends who
is the defensive marriage act, section three about federal benefits that the federal government has to give certain benefits to people who are lawfully married in their state who are gay. you can see justice kennedy making the deciding vote but on the federalism grounds. without talking about fundamental rights or equal protection. then there is california's prop 8 thing. i think the most likely thing there is there is some technicality of who will can stand in the room to respect your case. that is one way to hand it on the federalism grounds while not enshrining on the constitutional rights. they are not ready to do that. moving on the what is right now, what alex is going to talk about the hottest issue and that is gun control. president obama's executive actions, there were 23 of them. they were a pleasant surprise in a certain extend. he wasn't legislating himself a ban on assault weapons or confiscating guns or anything like that. i printed out the white house statement and drew a chart and tried to tick off where their potential second amendment problems and where there are other problems. i
of their brother. maybe it comes from his college football days as defensive back under the legendary john galardi. i always tease him and that he made up for modest talents with extraordinary dedication and a high threshold for pain. [laughter] this does remind me of the one topic that we will never agree, biking versus bears. -- vikings versus bears, and there's another reason we all love him so much, and that is his decency, his respect for those around him. ask any of the staff that are here today, and they will tell you despite the unbelievable pressures of service at this level, denis mcdonough is still the first to think about a colleague, or write a hand- written note to say thank you, or to ask about your family. that is the spirit that i want in this white house. this, of course, is reflected in his incredible love for his own family, liam, teddy -- i know that dad has been at work a lot during the week and on weekends, and i guarantee he would much rather be with you than with me, but the next job he will have will be demanding, two, but the one reason he does this is because he wants
to the country, here is our plan for the country, for the budget, for healthcare, for energy, defense. when we do that, we put our plans out against the president 's results, i think we will compare quite favorably. we will win back the trust of the american people and put our plan into action. that is what you do in moments like this. pick yourself up, dust yourself off, fight for what you believe in, and get back to work. the challenge is continued to mount. it is easy to get discouraged by it all. the election lost. the difficulties of the changes are coming. but it is a mortal sin to despair. i'm not ready to give up. i know you're not either. you would not be here if you wear. that is why i'm asking you for your help. every conservative needs to be involved. after the election, i needed to take a little bit of time. i needed to get into the woods. that is where i read charge. i took my daughter with me. she got her first ddeeer. [applause] that is what we do where we come from. i know other people cannot relate to that. but i realized sitting next to her, talking to her in the woods and how
, and they are your best line of defense against ad policy. -- bad policuy. host: we want to take our viewers to a live event at the brookings institute. it is the evolution of joints -- a force operations command and the pursuit of al qaeda in iraq. it is a conversation with general stanley mcchrystal, also featuring mike o'hanlon of brookings. thanks so much for joining us on "the washington journal." [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] mf good morning, everyone. welcome to brookings. thanks for coming out. it is an unusual treat, even at a place where we have such amazing events, to have general stanley mcchrystal here today. i am mike o'hanlon, one of the members of the 21st century defense initiative. we are hosting this event with bruce riddell, who runs the -- first readout -- bruce riddell .- bruce ridedel, general mcchrystal build up an organization into what was the state-of-the-art capability that ultimately led not only to our topic of today, the tracking and ultimate killing of the al qaeda terrorist zar
was a journalist. i did not believe i could lead to someone's defense and lead to the others defense but if i ask a question i want an answer. this is my style. i went through this thing when i was first chosen, thinking, i am not george stephanopoulos, but i was chosen for who i am and i was chosen for whatever body of work and have that i am proud of and i felt that -- the only thing i would say is different, i spent a lot of time on the questions. i crammed my head as much as i could and remembered things, but to me, i did what pointed questions and i wanted answers. we all have interviewed public figures and usually get 20 minutes and 18 minutes and you don't want to hound them over one topical item -- you cannot help but be part of this. you are looked at because of the questions you ask and what you contribute in the wake of that debate. >> there is another question having to do with the moderator's, and that was this business of, the political party is getting an answer to the question, what is the sistine mets going to be devoted to? devoted to economics or foreign policy, iraq and iran,
. they were angry at him for throwing them on the defensive for the prosecution of the war. as a result of the republican party getting thrown on its heels of immigration, in 2006 i published a book on hillary clinton. >> we're right to come back. >> let me finish this point. the morning that i, i had 150 radio interviews. the book was being sent off. i did eight interviews the first day. every single one of the interviews i came on the conservative radio station and i said i am here to talk about my book. the conservative radio host would say "and do not want to talk about that. i want to talk about immigration. what's the matter with the president? what is going non?" this is posted be a friendly audience. they hated hillary. no conservative wanted to talk about the democrats. the wanted to distance themselves from bush. >> you are the person i turn to when i am looking for optimism about the republican future. when i think what on earth are they doing, he makes sense of it in a way i appreciate. one of the republican governors that a lot of us are looking to is gov. bob be gentle. he
concerned of the fact that we are trying to nominate the secretary of defense for this country but are we dumb attain -- nominating a secretary of defense for the state of israel? i will take your answer off the air. host: that was part of the discussion yesterday. guest: absolutely. there was a lot of time spent on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with i
in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- that is what we call a leading answer. perception need to catch up with reality. the department has moved light years ahead. president obama has continued to ask congress for the resources we need to do that. women talk about the interaction with the private-sector, which we do in a number of areas already -- when we talk about the interaction with the private sector, which we do in a number of areas already, the part that
, and then look at defense spending and government spending, do a series of things to get the country on a better trajectory. when those people say that, there's very few people supporting an mp. even though an overwhelming majority of the country feels that way, it is typical it -- they are typically not actively engaged in supporting members of congress to take that position. members of congress should do what is in the best interest of the country. they should not look at their support systems to help them make decisions. unfortunately, at least in the past, many of them have done that. that is a structural flaw that we need to deal with as a country. if we need to create more support for people who serve in office who take the balance, moderate positions and tried to get things done. right now the incentives on all wrong. i am very sensitive to the position you put forth, you are upset with government. i am too. government has not done what we needed to do to help advance the interests abroad number of american citizens. that's one of the things i want to congress. i think you're getting at t
there and is here to talk to us about the recent decision by the defense department to lift the ban on women serving in combat roles. welcome to "washington journal." tell us a little bit about your military service. guest: enlisted in 2000. i wanted to get money to continue my education. the military seemed a great way to pay for graduate school. i was learning arabic on 9/11. it was immediately apparent that my military service was going to be profoundly different. it was no longer a question of if i would go to work, but when and where. i took part of the initial invasion of iraq under the command of general patraeus. even have heard of him. i spent about a year in the middle east and got out after serving five years. my husband sustained a serious injury in the war. host: what kind of were did you do in the military with the linn acrostics background? what kind of action did you see? -- linguistics background? guest: when we first invaded, there was a much stronger need for me to translate because there were not civilian interpreters available at the time. in baghdad i was going on foot patrol w
for throwing them on the defensive for the prosecution of the war. as a result of the republican party getting thrown on its heels of immigration, in 2006 i published a book on hillary clinton. >> we're right to come back. >> let me finish this point. the morning that i, i had 150 radio interviews. the book was being sent off. i did eight interviews the first day. every single one of the interviews i came on the conservative radio station and i said i am here to talk about my book. the conservative radio host would say "i do not want to talk about that. i want to talk about immigration. what's the matter with the president? what is going on?" this is supposed to be a friendly audience. they hated hillary. no conservative wanted to talk about the democrats. they wanted to distance themselves from bush. >> you are the person i turn to when i am looking for optimism about the republican future. when i think "what on earth are they doing," he makes sense of it in a way i appreciate. one of the republican governors that a lot of us are looking to is gov. bobby jindal. he makes a terrific outline of
's confirmation hearing of former senator chuck hagel to be secretary of defense. later on, looking at how americans across the country are doing financially. we will take those up after this. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign of any that i've ever covered. we will never see it again. facing george w. bush, who had all the republican party backing him and three republican governors and new hampshire and all the money. john mccain held 114 town meetings and he stayed there until every question was answered. you see the light all going off in people's heads, saying when are we going to get a patient's bill of rights? john mccain would say we're not calling to get the patient bill of rights as long as my party is owned and the democratic party is owned. he was candid and was totally open to the press. it was a candor and openness and all calmness -- and welcome nesss. >> mark shields, his career, sunday nights 8:00 on c-span. >> from almost the founding you're able to see fertility rates declining. by the time we had the second world war,
for recreation, defense, hunting. we ban clips, drums, strips of more than tablets. prohibit the manufacture of them or their sale or transfer. we are different from the new york state law. we don't require registration of grandfathered weapons. we are also different from the california law in that regard. in a sense, is a little bit more moderate in that regard. host: senator feinstein's judiciary committee meeting in the senate will hold a hearing on january 30 on wednesday to address gun-control. at that hearing will be wayne lapierre, executive vice president and chief executive officer of the national rifle association. one other story from today's paper on this subject is from "usa today" -- the story is in "usa today" by david jackson today. we have about five or 10 minutes left of this segment on the role of the united states on a world stage. i want to go to mike from oklahoma city, oklahoma, on the democratic line. thanks for getting up with us. caller: good morning. i was sitting here listening to some of these people on gun control. [indiscernible] he' these people calling in wit
defense. that probably hurt him. i do not think at that time he was ahead. one of the things i base this on, i started out that debate asking him a pretty pointed question about benghazi. republicans were really criticizing the president for this. this was a place where if governor romney really wanted to take on the president, he could have done it. he just sort of skipped by that question and went on to something else. i think he was afraid he did not want to appear overly aggressive and i think that was probably a mistake on his part. >> the reverse was true. obama for the first debate. he thought he was a hit and thought he could coast and he paid a price for it. >> yes, please. >> i am a washington d.c. resident. my question is for mr. schieffer. considering what you discussed about how most americans are watching news that is tailored to their political views and candidates are going on those news shows, this is one of the only opportunities for those 60 million americans to see a candidate willing to challenge them. do you think that changes the role the moderator plays in th
time since the recession ended. hurt by the biggest cuts in defense spending in 40 years. also, hurt by fewer exports and sluggish growth in company stockpiles. the economy contracted at an annual rate of 0.1% in the fourth quarter, a sharp slowdown from the 3.1% growth rate from july to september. the surprise contraction could raise fears about the economy's ability to handle tax increases that took effect in january and booming spending cuts. meanwhile, a private survey shows u.s. businesses increased hiring in january compared with a revised december reading. adp said employers added 192,000 jobs. the increase in hiring occurred after congress and the obama administration reached an agreement on january 1, avoiding sharp tax increases and across the board government spending cuts. the chairman of the senate judiciary committee sent in his prepared statement that closing loopholes in the background check system for gun purchases will not run firearm owners said mmm rights to own a gun and is a matter of common sense. after the killing of student and staffers in connecticut it is t
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